Tuesday, 19 March 2013

Autistic Children Have More Toxic Metals in their Blood


New evidence suggests that heavy metal exposure may be a cause of autism, in a study conducted by researchers from Arizona State University and published in the journal Biological Trace Element Research.

The researchers found that autistic children had significantly higher levels of numerous toxic metals in their blood than non-autistic children.

Autism is a neurological disorder that causes repetitive or restricted behavior and trouble with communication and social interaction. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it affects one in every 252 girls and one in every 54 boys in the United States. Although mainstream medicine long considered autism to be a hereditary disorder, increasing evidence is emerging that link the condition to various environmental factors, such as toxic exposure.
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Based on three separate scales of autism severity, the researchers also found that higher blood levels of toxic metals were associated with more severe cases of autism. In fact, between 38 and 47 percent of all variation in autism severity could be explained by varying heavy metal levels, particularly cadmium and mercury. This made toxic metal burden the single "strongest factor" predicting severity, the researchers said.


On one level, the findings come as no surprise, given the well-established neurotoxic effects of heavy metal exposure.

"We knew that exposure to lead makes people lose IQ points, and clearly it can induce autism," lead researcher James Adams said. "The study also showed that people with the highest levels are least able to excrete them."
http://www.naturalnews.com/039492_autism_children_heavy_metals.html

Our artificial environment may be the leading cause of illness rather than genetics. We are looking at the more subtle 20th and 21st century equivalent of the lead poisoning seen in the 19th century.


[Posted at the SpookyWeather blog, March 19th, 2013.]

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